Upon following the work of Jonathan Bagger…

Jonathan A. Bagger, CEO, American Physical Society (APS),
College Park, Maryland

ArXiv(40): Gauge Symmetry and Supersymmetry of Multiple M2-Branes, 2007
Book: w/Julius Wess, Supersymmetry and Supergravity: Revised and Expanded Edition, Princeton, March 1992, ISBN 0-691-02530-4
CV (Publications)
Homepages(s): Bio, IAS, John Hopkins, LinkedIN, TRIUMF lab
Videos: “Aspects of Supersymmetry, Part 1 – Jon Bagger”IAS, YouTube. 10 July 2017.
•  “Supersymmetry and Superspace, Part 2 – Jon Bagger”, IAS,YouTube. 11 July 2017
•  “Supersymmetry and Superspace, Part 3 – Jon Bagger”, IAS, YouTube. 10 July 2017
Wikipedia

August 31, 2022 at 4:42 PM 

Dear Prof. Dr. Jonathan Bagger:

First principles should be first principles, yet not all are equal. I enjoyed John Wheeler who insisted on simplicity; yet like his colleague, James Peebles, he never found those laws of physics that create the mechanisms for the universe to come into being.

Perhaps we need our friends within mathematics, especially geometry, and we need to begin with a most simple sphere which seems to divide its look-feel-functionality between the finite and infinite. As idiosyncratic as that sounds, here’s an outline: https://81018.com/analysis/ (in light of the JWST). It is totally idiosyncratic but isn’t that what we need to break out into a new paradigm or do we hope that our incrementalism does it?

Your comments as both CEO of APS and research professor at JHU would be most-highly regarded.  Thank you.

Warmly,

Bruce

PS. Since December 2011 we have been asking a question of leading scholars around the world: “What is between the electroweak scale and the Planck scale?” In June 2021 a group from Durham University called the Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology (IPPP) addressed the issue. In November 2021, it was reviewed in two homepages here, Smallest to Largest and Let’s go over this one more time. Indeed there appears to be a hierarchy that is best understood through infinitesimal fine tuning (mostly through thought experiments). Of course, it’s the hierarchy problem. -BEC