Niemeyer, Jens

Jens Niemeyer
University of Göttingen
Institute of Astrophysics
Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1
37077 Göttingen, Germany

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First email: Tuesday, June 1, 2:26 PM

RE: Mapping the first zeptosecond within Notations 65-to-67 of 202 exponential notations from the Planck units to the this day, the Now

Dear Prof. Dr. Jens Niemeyer:

Can we assume that the calculations of George Johnstone Stoney and Max Planck have at least some metaphorical validity as a partial description of the infinitesimal universe?

Might we assume that these numbers could concresce as an infinitesimal sphere? I realize that may be difficult.

What if the universe is in a dynamic relation, historically known as the finite-infinite relation; however, we avoid metaphorical language and consider only the description of the fullness pi (π) as a description of ultimate things? It seems that we can know much more about pi. What if the facets of this most-famous dimensionless constant are also facets of our very earliest universe and of the infinite?

We just might give Hilbert and all his extensions some time off.

Now, could a primordial sphere concresce? At what rate per second? Would it be fair to assume one primordial unit of time per primordial sphere? Now, that certainly would be quite a natural inflation.

We started our little project in December 2011 in a New Orleans high school. We are easily ignored so I started putting things up on web just to be able to share them with other schools and a few of the more open scholars. In 2016 we posted a horizontally-scrolled chart from the Planck units to the Age and Size of the Universe. You might enjoy that outline of a map of the universe: https://81018.com/chart/

The most recent work is always the homepage — https://81018.com/ — however, this week’s page revisits one from 2018: https://81018.com/envision/

If the concepts are anywhere close to reality, might it help to inform your work a little? 

Congratulations on what you and your team are doing.  I’ll be studying your past work and new developments
as much as I can.

Thank you so very much.

Warmly,

Bruce


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