Shechtman, Daniel

Daniel Shechtman

Articles: Quasicrystals Scoop Prize (RSC)
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Most recent email: 1 September 2020 @ 12 noon

Dear Prof. Dr. Daniel Shechtman:

We are picking up on an email that I sent you back in 2011. We are now following all your efforts with fivefold symmetry; it is a major study for us yet in a most idiosyncratic way.

Not long after this note you (below), our high school geometry classes began exploring the interiority of the tetrahedron and octahedron: https://81018.com/home/  Essentially we started following Zeno deeper and deeper inside. In about 45 steps we were down among the fermions, and in another 67 steps we were up against the Planck Wall.  We did an about-face, but this time we used the Planck Length as our standard measurement. Doubling each step, in 112 steps we were back in the classroom and in another 90 steps we were at the edge and age of the universe. It became our STEM tool of choice. After all, we created it!  …all with the Planck base units.

It was our base-2 map of the universe! It had the Planck base units, our simple geometries (tiling and tessellating the universe), all in 202 notations. Then it started asking us questions and now we are struggling.

I know you are stretched out thin as thin can be. Might you stretch a little more  and take a look at our evolving website and chart: http://81018.com and http://81018.comchart/  https://81018.com/gap/

Might you have any thoughts about it all?

Thank you.

Most sincerely,

Bruce

PS. We now have two Shechtman pages: https://81018.com/shechtman/ and one just for that first email:

Go to my first email: Thursday, October 20, 2011,10:25 PM

Please note that this email was also my first brief article based on limited research of Shechtman’s work and it happened before discovering there were just 202 base-2 notations to encapsulate all space, time, mass and charge!

Notes: Scaling theory of localization: Absence of quantum diffusion in two dimensions / pp. 673-676. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett Phys.Rev.Lett.,42,10  42.673. (p. 138).

Bjorken discovered in 1968 what is known as light-cone scaling (or Bjorken scaling), a phenomenon in the deep inelastic scattering of light on strongly interacting particles